What the Bible say I am?

Does God Say I Am I Am?

“And God said unto Moses, I Am That I Am: and he said, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, I Am hath sent me unto you” (Exodus 3:7–8, 13–14). …

Where does Jesus say who do you say I am?

“But what about you?” he asked. “Who do you say I am?” Simon Peter answered, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” Jesus replied, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah, for this was not revealed to you by man, but by my Father in heaven.

Where in the Bible does Jesus say I am God?

‘” John 8:58 “Jesus answered them: ‘I solemnly declare it: before Abraham came to be, I AM.” [This was the name God gave himself when he first communicated with Moses, Exodus 3:14 “God replied, ‘I am who am. ‘ Then he added, ‘This is what you shall tell the Israelites: I AM sent me to you. ‘”]

Who does Jesus say I am in the Bible?

In John 8:24 Jesus states: “For unless you believe that I am, you will die in your sins”, and later the crowd attempts to stone Jesus in response to his statement in John 8:58: “Before Abraham was, I am”.

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Who do you say I am Bible verse KJV?

[15] He saith unto them, But whom say ye that I am? [16] And Simon Peter answered and said, Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God.

What does Jesus say about himself?

Second, Jesus claimed to be the only way to God. “Jesus answered, ‘I am the way and the truth and the life. … “I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; I and the Father are one.” (John 10:28, 30) Only God could give eternal life, and this made it clear to all, that Jesus was claiming He was God Himself.

What is the meaning of I am who I am in the Bible?

I am that I am is a common English translation of the Hebrew phrase אֶהְיֶה אֲשֶׁר אֶהְיֶה‎, ‘ehye ‘ăšer ‘ehye ([ʔehˈje ʔaˈʃer ʔehˈje])– also “I am who I am,” “I will become what I choose to become”, “I am what I am,” “I will be what I will be,” “I create what(ever) I create,” or “I am the Existing One.” The …

What does it mean to be called for such a time as this?

Mordecai finished by suggesting to Esther the possibility that she had become queen “for such a time as this” (4:14). He reinforces the idea that, all of Esther’s life and the series of unusual events that led her to become queen, there was a greater purpose for her.