Why did God chose Aaron as priest?

Why did God make Aaron a priest and not Moses?

Some traditionists have wondered why Aaron, and not Moses, was appointed high priest. The answer has been found in an indication that Moses was rejected because of his original unwillingness when he was called by God.

Why is Aaron important in the Bible?

Aaron has an important role as priest in the Bible, particularly in the Hebrew Bible. When he is first introduced in Exodus 4:14, he is identified as the brother of Moses and as a Levite, one of the groups of priests. Hence, from the beginning, Aaron is seen as a priest.

Who did God choose to be high priest?

Aaron, though he is but rarely called “the great priest”, being generally simply designated as “ha-kohen” (the priest), was the first incumbent of the office, to which he was appointed by God (Book of Exodus 28:1–2; 29:4–5).

Who was Aaron to Moses?

In Egypt, Aaron was a faithful companion to his brother Moses. He attempted to impress Pharaoh with magical signs, such as changing his rod into a serpent and inducing many of the plagues.

What did Aaron’s sons do wrong?

Aaron’s sons Nadab and Abihu took their censers, put fire in them and added incense; and they offered unauthorized fire before the LORD, contrary to his command. So fire came out from the presence of the LORD and consumed them, and they died before the LORD.

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Who is Aaron in the Bible for kids?

Aaron is a person described in the Bible and the Qu’ran. He was the older brother of Moses. He helped Moses lead the Hebrews out of Egypt.

What does Aaron’s staff represent?

Aaron provides his rod to represent the tribe of Levi, and “it put forth buds, produced blossoms, and bore ripe almonds” (Numbers 17:8), as an evidence of the exclusive right to the priesthood of the tribe of Levi.

What is the origin of the name Aaron?

Meaning and Origin of: Aaron

Some believe it is of Hebrew origin meaning “high mountain; exalted, enlightened” and others state it is of Arabic origin and means “messenger”. The Hebrew version is Aharon, Aaran in Yiddish, and Haroun or Harun in Arabic.